Mt Gambier Prison Stage 2

Mt Gambier Prison Stage 2

The additional Yerkalalpata 84 Bed Accommodation consists of Accommodation Units, a Support Building which houses programs, education rooms and medical facility, the Industries Building and the Registration Building. These particular buildings are positioned in a way to open out into a shared outdoor courtyard, enhancing the sense of community amongst the prisoner population.

The new facilities in Mt Gambier were located within the secure perimeter of the existing prison and the Accommodation Unit area facility consists of three double storey Duplex Accommodation Units designed to promote independent living within a community arrangement.

Our collaborative approach is driven by both an unrivalled understanding of Corrections operational procedures and a constantly developing library of construction methods and details that reflect the unique typology and demands of Corrections facilities.

 

Pt Augusta Prison Stage 2

Pt Augusta Prison Stage 2

The 128 bed accommodation is our latest addition to Pt Augusta Prison and representative of the meticulous examination of detail we apply to every Corrections project.

Our design philosophy for Corrections pursues viable reductions in life cycle cost and functional improvements in design. Successful examples on this project include:

  • Precast thermomass panels for rapid on-site erection,
  • Revised window detailing for improved daylight penetration without compromising security,
  • Improved accommodation layouts for equitable bed distribution,
  • Improved kitchen amenities,
  • Refined construction detailing.
  • Importantly, providing more humane environments that support rehabilitation goals is an overarching design philosophy.
  • An improved prisoner ambient environment is a proven strategy in rehabilitation.
  • Better surveillance improves safety for staff.
  • Improved energy efficiency, attention to constructability and quality design all supports an asset of community value.

STEM Works Upgrades

STEM Works Upgrades

Thomson Rossi has been engaged by DPTI to create STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths) in five South Australian Schools as part of an SA Government stimulus package. There has been growing attention globally, and more recently in Australia, on the importance of STEM as a core driver of student learning. Not only does this integrate areas of the curriculum, but it also challenges traditional spaces at school; what’s the difference between a Science Lab and a STEM Space? STEM uses existing knowledge and date to develop new insights on solving a complex problem with creativity. This rich methodology has therefore seen the increase in maker spaces, coding, media labs, robotics, 3D printing, Science Fairs, and challenge-based competitions in and around schools. These types of experiences aim to stimulate student learning and motivation around STEM, but often require more specifically designed spaces and resources to generate the highest impact possible. Students, like workers in complex industry seek; challenge in their learning or work; collaboration on those challenging projects; choice in how to meet objectives; responsibility for making decisions about their learning or work; respect for the learning decisions they make; and real things to get stuck into, not fake, pseudo problems.

South Australia Drill Core Reference Library officially opened

South Australia Drill Core Reference Library officially opened

The new $32.2 million South Australia Drill Core Reference Library was officially opened by SA Premier Jay Weatherill and Mineral Resources and Energy Minister Tom Koutsantonis on Wednesday 17th February.

The Premier’s statement reads “This flagship facility will bring together more than 7.5 million metres of drill core samples from across the State, capturing more than 100 years of exploration,” Mr Weatherill said. “It is a one-stop-shop for industry and geoscience explorers seeking easy access to the State’s inventory of drill cores generated from historical and recent exploration efforts, enabling companies to better target potential discoveries. “It will boost exploration opportunities, unlocking the potential of South Australia’s resource wealth for many decades.”

South Australian Chamber of Mines and Energy President Terry Burgess said the facility is one of the “unique core libraries in the world” and holds cores dating back more than 100 years. “When geologists drill a hole they will interpret it at the time so the knowledge is based upon that moment and as knowledge increases some of that historical drilling can be re-addressed and reinterpreted … discoveries are going to be made in this building,” Burgess said.

The Drill Core Library incorporates a drill core viewing area, conference and education rooms and the latest 3D facilities that provide scientists with a 3D view of geology and mineral deposits under the earth’s surface. The facility also provides direct access to South Australia’s extensive library of geoscience information through SARIG (South Australian Resource Information Geoserver).

Thomson Rossi Architects partnered with Aurecon, Hansen Yuncken, Bianco Precast, Boral and Adelaide Brighton Cement and the specialist drill core viewing tables were manufactured by Southeast Conveyors.